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Thursday, July 16, 2020 | History

5 edition of Jepthah"s Vow Fulfilled And His Daughter Not Sacrificed found in the catalog.

Jepthah"s Vow Fulfilled And His Daughter Not Sacrificed

by W. Romaine

  • 345 Want to read
  • 27 Currently reading

Published by Kessinger Publishing, LLC .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Non-Classifiable,
  • Novelty

  • The Physical Object
    FormatPaperback
    Number of Pages48
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL11892001M
    ISBN 101428658068
    ISBN 109781428658066

      Language, repetition and syntax–A careful examination of the language of the vow and the subsequent events that follow, show that the author uses repetition to drive home the tragic point that Jephthah offered his daughter up as a burnt we render the first part of Jephthah’s vow literally, he says, “The one going out who goes out of the doors of my house to meet me.   Many people over the years have objected to Jephthah having made a vow to offer the girl as a sacrifice because human sacrifice is forbidden in the Law of Moses. However, in keeping with the theme of the book—failed leadership apart from God—there is no indication that Jephthah would have had the knowledge of the.

      Simply put, when a vow is made, God will fulfill his agreement, which means the person must fulfill their end of the vow or he/she will be sinning against the Lord (Deut. ). The Story Now that vows are understood, the story of Jephthah’s vow can be further understood. How did Yiftach (Jephthah) fulfill his vow to "sacrifice" his daughter? He sacrificed his free will when he didn't annul his vow. The sacrifice was that she never married. She became a servant who had to sacrifice all her time to serve others. The sacrifice was that she was killed.

      But yes, the text does say that Jephthah performed his vow concerning his daughter, which did not involve substituting with an animal. It was, indeed, highlighting his foolishness. Earlier in that chapter, Jephthah himself said, “So whatever the Lord our God takes possession of before us, we will possess” (v. 24).   V35 "And it came to pass, when he saw her, that he rent his clothes, and said, Alas, my daughter! thou hast brought me very low, and thou art one of them that trouble me: for I have opened my mouth unto the LORD, and I cannot go back." Jephthah must fulfill his vow and offer up as a burnt offering his only child.


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Jepthah"s Vow Fulfilled And His Daughter Not Sacrificed by W. Romaine Download PDF EPUB FB2

Some conservative scholars argue vigorously that he fulfilled his vow and took her life (see Kaiser, pp. Some of their arguments are as follows.

It is contended that almost all early writers believed that Jephthah did actually sacrifice his daughter. In his defense, Jephthah might point out that it was actually his daughter who insisted that he fulfill his vow to God (Judges ) perhaps mitigating to some extent his responsibility.

Her death might even be regarded as an act of martyrdom, not unlike Samson’s willingness to die for the sake of his God and his people. The Bible does not explicitly state that Jephthah sacrificed his daughter as a burnt offering. Since his daughter was mourning the fact that she would never marry instead of mourning that she was about to die (Judges ), this possibly indicates that Jephthah gave her to the tabernacle as a servant instead of sacrificing her.

After this period of time Jephthah fulfilled his vow and offered his daughter. The majority opinion among commentators is that Jephthah killed his daughter as an act of human sacrifice. There is, however, a minority opinion that Jephthah's daughter spent the rest of her life in seclusion.

Another troubling episode recorded in the book of Judges appears inwhen the judge Jephthah makes a vow that many have argued cost him the life of his daughter and only child—a human sacrifice. I argued that I believe Jephthah did actually sacrifice his daughter to fulfill his rash vow.

Most of the correspondence has been very civil, some have asked for clarification while others have steadfastly Jepthahs Vow Fulfilled And His Daughter Not Sacrificed book the idea that Jephthah merely dedicated his daughter to the Lord’s service, in which she would live as a virgin all of her : Tim Chaffey.

Jephthah's sacrifice of his daughter stands in stark contrast to the Binding of Isaac in the Book of Genesis, in which Abraham was about to perform a divinely ordered sacrifice of his son, when an angel of God directly intervened and stopped the sacrifice. In spite of that, he’ll always be remembered as the foolish, cruel father who sacrificed his daughter due to an unnecessary vow.

Jephthah ruled Israel for only six years (Judges ). Scripture makes no mention of anyone mourning his death, or of any other children born to him. When he recovered, Jephthah told his daughter of his vow to God (verse 35) and how there was no retreat.

He now must fulfill his sacred oath. His pious daughter understood fully but asked if she could first roam the hills of their homeland with her best friends for just two months to lament the fact she will now never be able to marry.

Jephthah offered up his daughter as a whole burnt offering. Jephthah devoted his daughter to the sanctuary of the Lord as a perpetual virgin, or secluded her away with no hope of marrying and bearing children. Now, it was time for Jephthah to fulfill his vow to God.

When Jephthah arrived at his home, to his shock and grieve, his daughter was the first one who came out of his house. Obviously, Jephthah did not expect his daughter to meet him. The decision to keep the vow had been very hard for Jephthah since his daughter was his only child.

Richard Dawkins describes this account as a “story of human sacrifice” that ended unhappily. 1 Former preacher turned atheist Dan Barker says that Jephthah “found it hard to murder his daughter, but he was obligated by a vow to God to go through with it, and he did, without condemnation.” 2.

For Jephthah to shrink back from fulfilling his vow would have broken something in the core of his being. It was not a matter of his own personal pride, but of the very fabric of his humanity, and not only his, but also the integrity of his people. Even his great love for his daughter could not nullify his vow to his God.

Jephthah’s daughter. Based on this idea, many of the biblical commentators4maintain that Jephthah did not offer his daughter as a sacrifice. The story of Jephthah’s Daughter (Judges 11) tells us that Jephthah the Gileadite made a vow to the Lord before going into battle with the Ammonites.

He vowed that if he succeeded in battle he would offer up to the Lord as a burnt offering whatever first came forth from his doors of his house to meet him.

Also, the words "he carried out his vow with her which he had vowed" show that he had divine approval for his actions. God would not have approved of human sacrifice. If God had not approved, the writer would have written of God's displeasure, as he did with Gideon's making of a golden ephod (Judges ).

And certainly it would not have become. So Jephʹthah’s daughter goes to Shiʹloh, and she spends the rest of her life serving Jehovah at his tabernacle.

Four days out of every year the women of Israel go to visit her there, and they have a happy time together.

The people love Jephʹthah’s daughter because she is such a good servant of Jehovah. If Jephthah did sacrifice his daughter in order to fulfill his vow, then it is obvious that God allowed him to kill his daughter and it is obvious that God allowed his daughter to give herself as a sacrifice.

It is wrong to be critical of Jephthah for sacrificing his daughter and to ignore her statement in Judges While I agree that God commanded Israel to not sacrifice their children and the Jephthah ought to have broken his vow, the text seems to indicate that he did kill his daughter.

People in the Bible often do things that are cruel and wicked. So while this is an interesting comment on the question, it. Jepthah's vow fulfilled, and his daughter not sacrificed, proved in a sermon preached before the University, at St.

Mary's in Oxford. By W. Romaine, : William Romaine. Ver 38, and 39 all specifically reference the virginity of the daughter, but never her death. We are told in verse 39 that Jephthah fulfilled his vow. The very next words are, “she knew no man,” a puzzling, even incomprehensible, detail if she has just lost her life.In the 12th Chapter of Judges, Jephthah made a vow to God to present as a “burnt offering” the first thing that comes out of his house to greet him, if God will let him defeat the Ammonites.

As anyone whose read the story knows, his daughter rushes out to greet him, and gamely submits to the terms of her father’s vow.The original Hebrew text of Judges chapter 11 does indicate that Jephthah kept his vow and sacrificed his daughter.

But, would God have been pleased with, or even required, such an action?